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Taliban Celebrates American Withdrawal From Afghanistan

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After the last US troops flew out of Afghanistan to conclude two decades of conflict, the hardline Islamist Taliban celebrated their entire return to power with gunfire.

On Monday night, the United States’ longest military conflict came to an end as its Marines left Kabul airport, where they had overseen a frantic flight that saw over 123,000 Afghans evacuate.

Taliban fighters stormed the airport and celebrated by firing weapons into the skies throughout the city — an incredible comeback after US forces invaded and toppled them in 2001, weeks after the September 11 attacks, for backing al-Qaeda. “My heartiest congratulations to Afghanistan… This triumph belongs to all of us,” Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid told reporters on the airport runway hours later. “We make it clear to every occupier that anyone who looks at Afghanistan with a malevolent eye will suffer the same fate as the Americans. “We’ve never succumbed to coercion or force, and our country has always sought liberty,” says the author. Mujahi

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid speaks to Badri 313 military unit at Kabul’s airport, Afghanistan August 31, 2021 in this still image obtained from a handout video. Taliban/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS – THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. MANDATORY CREDIT.

Talibanis stormed the airport and celebrated by firing weapons into the skies throughout the city — an incredible comeback after US forces invaded and toppled them in 2001, weeks after the September 11 attacks, for backing al-Qaeda.

“My heartiest congratulations to Afghanistan… This triumph belongs to all of us,” Taliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid told reporters on the airport runway hours later. “We make it clear to every occupier that anyone who looks at Afghanistan with a malevolent eye will suffer the same fate as the Americans. “We’ve never succumbed to coercion or force, and our country has always sought liberty,” says Mujahid.

The Taliban’s success, Mujahid declared, was a “lesson for other invaders.” Many Afghans fear a repetition of the Taliban’s early rule from 1996 to 2001, when they were notorious for their treatment of women and girls, as well as a harsh punishment system. Mujahid maintained the Taliban’s promise of a more tolerant kind of rule than during their first term in power.

“We want to have positive relations with the United States and the rest of the globe. He stated, “We welcome good diplomatic relations with all of them.” Taliban security forces, Mujahid added, will be “kind and courteous.”The Taliban face a difficult task in transitioning from an insurgent group to a government in a war-torn country reliant on international aid. The United Nations has issued a warning that a humanitarian crisis is looming, with food supplies running low due to conflict and a severe drought. Some Afghans urged the Islamist movement to follow through on its pledge of a more moderate governance.
On Twitter, Fawzia Koofi, a human rights activist and former negotiator for the deposed government who has twice escaped murder attempts, urged the Taliban to include all Afghans in the country’s governance. She wrote, “Taliban, hear us out: we must rebuild together!” “This land belongs to all of us,” says the narrator. In the midst of the melancholy, other campaigners fought to find hope. Muska Dastageer, a lecturer at the American University of Afghanistan, remarked on Twitter, “If I let my thoughts linger on what we have lost, I will lose my sanity.”

On August 15, the US-led airlift began as the Taliban completed an incredible rout of government forces across the country and grabbed control of the capital. After withdrawing nearly all American forces, Mr. Biden was compelled to bring back around 6000 more to undertake the airlift. As his detractors continued to slam him for his handling of the pullout, Mr Biden announced he will address the nation today in Washington.

“We can’t fight perpetual wars,” Republican Senator Rick Scott remarked, “but the extent and consequence of Biden’s failure here is staggering.” Secretary of State Antony Blinken, Biden’s senior diplomat, was only able to offer the Taliban severe words.

“Any legitimacy and any assistance will have to be earned,” Secretary Blinken said as he revealed the US diplomatic mission in Kabul had been halted and operations had been relocated to Qatar.  All eyes will now be on how the Taliban conduct their first few days as the country’s only rulers, with a particular focus on whether they would allow people who want to leave – including some foreigners – to do so freely. Sec. Blinken stated that just a tiny number of US citizens remained in the nation, estimating that there were “under 200” but most likely closer to 100. The number of British citizens in Afghanistan is said to be in the “low hundreds.”

Thousands of Afghans who have collaborated with the US-backed administration in the past and are afraid of retaliation want to flee. In recent days, Western allies have expressed disappointment that not all Afghans who wished to evacuate were able to board the evacuation flights. The. Afghan crisis is way too serious than it seems. follow us to stay updated

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